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Hi Raskolnikov, 谢谢你! 这是我最喜欢的一条旗袍,因为我穿这条旗袍看起来比较瘦!O(∩_∩)O哈哈~
Comment by Ellie_Chinese teacher posted on November 18, 2011   2 Comments
Thanks for your inquiry. I’m Lisa, a member of eChineseOnline’s customer support team. Just sign up for your 7-day free trial! You will then have FREE access to ALL of our Chinese courses for 7 days. Once you start a new membership and become a paying member of eChineseOnline, you are charged based ...
Comment by Lisa_eChineseOnline Support posted on November 1, 2011   8 Comments
Dear Mr. Zee, I’m so glad to hear that you find our website helpful . We strive to provide Chinese learners like you with quality lessons that will help you move forward in your studies. Hope you can make progress with us. Helen
Comment by Helen Zhang (Chinese Teacher) posted on November 1, 2011   1 Comment
Thanks for your support. We will continue to do better.
Comment by Helen Zhang (Chinese Teacher) posted on October 28, 2011   8 Comments
There is a nice jacket on sale, but it is still outside your budget. Maybe you can convince the shopkeeper to lower the price, but first you need to learn how to barter in Chinese. In this lesson from eChineseOnline, you will learn some Chinese words and phrases that will help you be a more savvy sh...
Comment by anne.ji posted on October 18, 2011   0 Comment
日不暇给 (rì bù xiá jǐ) 日 (rì): refers to the day. 不 (bù): a negative adverb. 暇 (xiá): means free. 给 (jǐ): means is enough. We use this Chinese idiom to express that there are too many things to do, but there isn’t enough time.
Comment by Helen Zhang (Chinese Teacher) posted on September 26, 2011   1 Comment
Literally, it translates to “我已经好久没见到你了。(Wǒ yǐjīng hǎo jiǔ méi jiàn dào nǐ le.)” You can also use this shorter version “好久不见。(Hǎo jiǔ bú jiàn.) Long time no see.” Here is a video lesson about “好久不见。(Hǎo jiǔ bú jiàn.)” you might find useful. http://www.echineseonline.com/free-chinese-lessons
Comment by Helen Zhang (Chinese Teacher) posted on September 26, 2011   1 Comment
Zhù nǐ kuàilè, ling wài dài wǒ wènhou nǐ de fù mǔ. 祝你快乐,另外代我问候你的父母 I hope you are happy. Please send my regards to your parents. Some other related Chinese sentences: Zhù nǐ shēngtǐ jiànkāng. 祝你身体健康。 Hope you will have good health. Zhù nǐ tiāntiān kāixīn. 祝你天天开心。 I Hope you will be happy everyday. ...
Comment by Helen Zhang (Chinese Teacher) posted on September 26, 2011   1 Comment
The Pinyin and Chinese characters for the sentence you mentioned are: Zhè dàyuē yào huā shí gè bàn xiǎoshí. 这大约要花十个半小时。 It takes about ten hours thirty minutes. Learn words in this sentence: “花” can be used as both noun and verb. As a noun, it refers to flower. As a verb, it mean “to cost, to spend....
Comment by Helen Zhang (Chinese Teacher) posted on September 25, 2011   1 Comment
In Chinese, we often use the structure “再(zài)+adj.+不过了(búguò le).” It similar to “It can be + comparative adj. ” For examples: Nǐ néng lái nà zài hǎo búguò le. 你能来那再好不过了。 It can't be any better if you are able to come. Zhè jiàn chènyī zhēn shì zài piányi búguò le. 这件衬衫真是再便宜不过了。 This shirt can’t be ...
Comment by Helen Zhang (Chinese Teacher) posted on September 25, 2011   1 Comment
The Mandarin Phrase “真不错” can be translated into “That’s good. That’s fantastic.” It is often used when someone is very satisfied with something. For examples: Zhèjiàn qípáo zhēn búcuò. 这件旗袍真不错。 This Cheongsam is very nice. Jīntiān tiānqì zhēn búcuò. 今天天气真不错。 The weather today is very nice.
Comment by Helen Zhang (Chinese Teacher) posted on September 25, 2011   1 Comment
Yes,“拉倒 (lā dǎo)” is Chinese slang which means forget about it; never mind; drop it; let it go. For examples: Wǒ méi qián mǎi, suǒyǐ zhèjiàn shì hái shì lādǎo ba. 我没钱买,所以这事还是拉倒吧。 I dont have enough money for that, so lets forget about it. Lādǎo ba! Fǎn zhèng yě bù zhí jǐ gè qián. 拉倒吧!反正也不值几个钱。 Never...
Comment by Helen Zhang (Chinese Teacher) posted on September 20, 2011   1 Comment
“哈韩族hā hán zú” refers to young people who love Korean pop songs, Korean TV dramas or Korean fashion. “哈hā”can be understand as to follow the tide of… Dàxuéshēng lǐ yǒu xiāngdāng yìpī hāhánzú, kuángrè de zhuīpěng Hánguó liúxíng de yǐngshìjù míngxīng jíqí chuānzhuó dǎbàn. 大学生里有相当一批哈韩族,狂热地追捧韩国流行的影视剧明星及...
Comment by Helen Zhang (Chinese Teacher) posted on September 20, 2011   1 Comment
Yes, “all” and “both” can both be translated into “都 (dōu)”in Mandarin Chinese. In Chinese sentence, “都” is always put after the subject and before the predicate. Look at the examples you mentioned: Tāmen dōu xǐhuān liúxíng yīnyuè. 他们都喜欢流行音乐。 Both of them like pop music. In the sentence above, “都” i...
Comment by Helen Zhang (Chinese Teacher) posted on September 20, 2011   2 Comments
The Mandarin Chinese word “也 yě” translates into “also/too.” It is usually put before the predicate to indicate that the subject will do something./ or have a certain kind of feature, too. For example: Nǐ dǎsuàn qù páshān, wǒ yě xiǎng qù. 你打算去爬山,我也想去。 You are planning to go hiking. I also want to g...
Comment by Helen Zhang (Chinese Teacher) posted on September 19, 2011   1 Comment

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